ALLIGATOR PEPPER

ALLIGATOR PEPPER

A pepper pod with it’s seeds known as Grains of Paradise. It comes from the west of Africa and is native to swampy habitats. It is an expensive spice used sparingly in cuisine. During the Covid-19 pandemic it was used in medicine for its antiviral properties and has also been used as a remedy for skin disease

ALOE

ALOE

A succulent plant species that grows in varied climates around the world. As well as being a common decorative indoor plant, Aloe has a long history of medicinal and consumer uses including beverages, skin lotions, ointments, cosmetics, and gels for minor burns and sunburns. It is also used to reduce dental plaque

CARAWAY

CARAWAY

Native to Western Asia, Europe and North Africa. Caraway was used in food and medicine in ancient Greece and Rome as well as in the Arab world being cultivated in Morocco. It has historically been used to treat stomach ulcers and small studies have shown the oil to relax smooth muscle tissue in the digestive tract to relieve indigestions

CHAMOMILE

CHAMOMILE

Can be found on all continents but is mainly native to southern and Eastern Europe. Chamomile is most typically ingested via herbal teas but its blue essential oil can also be processed into pill form. Known mostly for it’s calming and soothing properties, it is also used for gastrointestinal issues and can be used to treat irritation of the skin

CHICORY ROOT

CHICORY ROOT

Comes from the Chicory plant where the leaves are used as a salad and the root is cultivated and used as a coffee substitute and food additive. They’re a good source of prebiotic fibre, promoting healthy digestion, and is used as substitutes for fat and sugar content in lower calorie food to assist in weight loss

COFFEE

COFFEE

Starts life as a coffee fruit in which the seeds are extracted from the flesh (Cascara) dried and then roasted. It originated in the Horn of Africa and South Arabia. As well as containing the stimulant caffeine, coffee has been linked to a decreased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and a lowered risk of chronic liver disease

HEATHER

HEATHER

A low growing evergreen shrub common to Europe and Asia Minor. It was traditionally used in Ancient Greece to sweep floors and has been used to dye wool yellow and tan leather. Heather has been used to flavour honey and whisky liqueurs and medicinally as an aid to help depression, insomnia and exhaustion

MINT

MINT

Grows widely across the world, preferring wet environments and moist soils. Used across many cuisines mint can be found in teas, cocktails and food and is popular for it’s breath freshening aroma. The ancient greeks rubbed mint on their arms to increase strength. More modern medicinal uses apply it for stomach aches and chest pains

MULBERRY

MULBERRY

Grows widely across the world and resembles a blackberry at one stage of it’s growth. Mulberry leaves are the sole food of the silkworm from which producers  create silk garments. They’re often used in wines, cordials and herbal teas. Mulberries may lower cholesterol levels and improve blood sugar control

OLIVE LEAVES

OLIVE LEAVES

Can be found all around the mediterranean and have had many uses throughout the history of the world. The dried leaves were often burned as an incense in muslim mediterranean countries. They’re high in antioxidants, especially polyphenol which can prevent cognitive decline, cancer, and osteoporosis

PAPRIKA

PAPRIKA

A spice made from dried and ground red peppers. Originally only found in central Mexico they were brought to Spain in the 16th century. Paprika in the UK is commonly of the Spanish variety in which there are three versions with heat levels of mild, mildly spicy and spicy. Its benefits include improving immunity and alleviating gas

PASSIONFRUIT

PASSIONFRUIT

A vine species of Passion flower native to southern Brazil through Paraguay and northern Argentina. The fruit is a type of berry that comes in a variety of shapes and colours. Passionfruit is high in antioxidants which the body uses to make and repair cells. It is also ingested to lower inflammation

QUINCE

QUINCE

Native to the Hyrcanian forest region south of the Caspian Sea but thrives in a variety of climates including Scotland. It was a sacred emblem of Aphrodite and also featured in Roman cookbooks where they were preserved by submerging the fruits in honey and reduced wine. Quince inhibits the growth of H. Pylori, an ulcer causing stomach bacteria.